A Jungian Study of Shakespeare: The Visionary Mode by Matthew A. Fike

By Matthew A. Fike

Utilising the analytical psychology of Carl Jung, Matthew A. Fike offers a clean realizing of individuation in Shakespeare. This examine of “the visionary mode”— Jung’s time period for literature that comes during the artist from the collective unconscious—combines a robust grounding in Jungian terminology and concept with fantasy feedback, biblical literary feedback, and postcolonial conception. Fike attracts generally at the wealthy discussions within the amassed Works of C. G. Jung to light up chosen performs akin to A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The service provider of Venice, The Henriad, Othello, and Hamlet in new and wonderful methods. Fike’s transparent and thorough method of Shakespeare bargains interesting, unique scholarship that may attract scholars and students alike.

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That part, of course, is the collective unconscious, which has “a spaceless and timeless quality” (CW 10, 849/450). He explains that time and space are “limiting factors” on “corporeal man” because of his “low frequency”; but we are also “psychic beings . . not entirely dependent upon space and time,” beings whose “psychic totality reaches beyond the barrier of space and time” (CW 18, 684/287, 753/315, and 1572/695). The dimensions of space and time set boundaries for our physical bodies and presumably for our conscious minds; but for Jung the unconscious mind—the psychic or spiritual part of the psyche— transcends these boundaries.

It is here that Shakespeare and Jung part company. Regarding the afterlife, Jung is more concerned with discovering how spirituality reflects the psyche than with making “a metaphysical statement” (CW 8, 585/309, n. 5). At his most pessimistic, he writes in “The Soul and Death” (1934), “Therefore I shall certainly not assert now that one must believe death to be a second birth leading to survival beyond the grave,” though he states that all the great religions think so (CW 8, 804/408). If souls are linked to the personal unconscious and spirits to the collective unconscious (CW 8, 591/312), spiritual manifestation is simply a projection of unconscious content.

5). At his most pessimistic, he writes in “The Soul and Death” (1934), “Therefore I shall certainly not assert now that one must believe death to be a second birth leading to survival beyond the grave,” though he states that all the great religions think so (CW 8, 804/408). If souls are linked to the personal unconscious and spirits to the collective unconscious (CW 8, 591/312), spiritual manifestation is simply a projection of unconscious content. Although Jung acknowledges “universal reports of .

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